It’s time to stop payment on Columbus corruption | News, Sports, Jobs


MR. EDITOR:

At a time when Ohio families worry about their ability to make ends meet, the last thing we should be spending our hard-earned cash on is the corruption plaguing Mike DeWine’s Statehouse.

As taxpayers, we continue to be stuck with $287,000 a day to bail out two old, dirty coal plants, including one in Indiana. These grants are estimated to cost Ohioans $1.5 billion by 2030. The grants were part of the $60 million corruption scandal that led to the passage of Bill 6. until the scandal came to light and the former president was charged, these grants were never cancelled.

And the governor’s office blocked requests for public records to examine the governor’s possible ties to the biggest corruption scandal in Ohio history. On May 5, a lawsuit was filed seeking disclosure of the heavily redacted governor’s office schedule. It appears the governor is using blanket privileges to hide meetings held with his office, so the court is being urged to demand transparency.

Taxpayers have a right to know what Governor DeWine knew and when he knew it.

Ignoring these requests for public records is normal, showing an incredible amount of arrogance and lack of responsibility. Similarly, members of the GOP redistricting commission refused to submit constitutional voting cards, cards they had rejected as unconstitutional by the Ohio Supreme Court four times. This disregard for the law by GOP commission members, including the governor, forced voters to hold two primaries and cost Ohioans at least another $20 million to hold an additional primary election.

The supermajority of GOP elected officials in Columbus seems to make them feel above the law. It’s time to bring some balance and accountability to Columbus and end the Republican supermajority. We have a choice in the November elections. Let’s choose candidates who will serve the people — not special interests and themselves.

KAREN ZEHR

Warren



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Elaine R. Knight