2022 Social Security Supplemental Income Payment Schedule – Payments up to $841 drop next week

MILLIONS of Americans will receive their next round of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) next week.

Payments worth up to $841 will be sent to eligible SSI recipients on Wednesday, June 1.

The payment schedule for SSI recipients is comparable to that of people who started collecting Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits before 1997.

Benefits are paid on the first of each month unless it falls on a weekend or public holiday.

The exact timing of SSDI payments depends on the recipient’s date of birth. However, the timing is different if the person started receiving payments before 1997.

Payments worth up to $3,333 will be sent on May 25 to SSDI recipients whose birthdays fall on the 21st and 31st of each month.

Read our Supplemental Security Income live blog for the latest news and updates…

  • Savings Penalty Elimination Act Helps Protect Seniors

    The current limit is $2,000 for an individual and $3,000 for a couple.

    Republican Senator Rob Portman said: “Rising costs and inflation affect all Americans, but especially the elderly and disabled in our country,

    “Yet the Supplemental Security Income program that serves these vulnerable populations hasn’t been updated in decades and punishes them for trying to save responsibly.”

  • Savings Penalty Elimination Act Could Expand SSI

    The bill would update its rules on asset limits and the amount of money beneficiaries would be allowed to set aside.

    SSI has rigid asset limits that have not been updated since the late 80s.

    According to proposalindividual beneficiaries could have up to $10,000 and couples could have $20,000.

    This would give beneficiaries a nice cushion in case of an emergency, without affecting their benefits.

  • A new federal proposal could reduce SSI qualifications

    Two senators from Ohio have introduced a bill that would update asset limits to Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

    The Savings Penalty Elimination Act was proposed by Senators Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman and won bipartisan support.

  • Five reasons why you might not receive SS benefits

    There are several reasons why you might not receive Social Security benefits.

    They include:

    • If you have moved abroad to a certain country (countries like Cuba and North Korea will prevent you from receiving Social Security benefits)
    • If you are not eligible for spousal benefits
    • If you haven’t worked hard enough
    • If you work while claiming
    • If you were a federal or railroad worker (some workers who contributed to other retirement systems might not be eligible for Social Security benefits)
  • The maximum monthly amount revealed

    In 2022, the maximum federal SSI payment for an eligible person is $841 per month.

    The amount is $1,261 per month for an eligible individual with an eligible spouse.

    The monthly cost for an essential person is $421.

  • The Social Security Tax Rate Explained

    The tax rate for 2022 income is 6.2% each for employees and employers.

    Thus, individuals earning $147,000 or more in 2022 would contribute $9,114 to the OASDI program, and their employer would contribute the same amount, depending on the Social Security Administration.

    For the self-employed, the OASDI tax rate is 12.4%.

  • Do Social Security applicants have to pay taxes?

    In January of each year, you will be informed of the amount of benefits you received during the previous year.

    This Social Security benefits statement is an SSA-1099 form and can be used to help you complete your tax return.

    By using this form, you will know if your monthly benefits are taxable.

    If in February you have not received this form, or if you have misplaced it, you can request a new one using your online social security account.

  • When SSI payments were established

    Supplemental Security Income payments began in January 1974.

    In all 50 states and the District of Columbia, SSI replaced previous federal state adult assistance programs.

    Each person eligible for SSI receives a monthly cash payment based on a statutory federal benefit rate.

    Since 1975, these rates have increased by the same amount as cost-of-living adjustments to OASDI benefits.

  • How to apply for survivors’ benefits, part four

    To apply for parental benefits, the Social Security Administration stipulates that you must prove your eligibility by providing the following documents:

    • Death certificate of the deceased child
    • Your birth certificate
    • Proof of your U.S. citizenship or legal alien status
    • Proof of US Army discharge papers (if you did your military service before 1968)
    • Your W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns for the previous year
  • How to apply for survivors’ benefits, part three

    To apply for mother’s or father’s benefits, the Social Security Administration stipulates that you must prove your eligibility by providing the following documents:

    • Proof of worker’s death
    • Your birth certificate or other documents proving your birth
    • Proof of your U.S. citizenship or legal alien status
    • Evidence of US Army discharge papers
    • Your W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns for the previous year
    • Marriage certificate
    • Final Divorce Judgment (if you are applying as a surviving divorced parent)
    • Child’s birth certificate
  • How to apply for survivors’ benefits, part two

    According to Social Security AdministrationTo apply for widow’s/widower’s or divorced surviving spouse’s benefits, you must prove your eligibility by providing the following documents:

    • Proof of worker’s death
    • Your birth certificate or other documents proving your birth
    • Proof of your U.S. citizenship or legal alien status
    • Proof of US Army discharge papers (if you did your military service before 1968)
    • Your W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns for the previous year
    • Final Divorce Judgment (if applying as a surviving divorced partner)
    • Marriage certificate
  • How to apply for survivors’ benefits, part one

    According to Social Security AdministrationTo apply for family allowances, you must prove that the child is eligible for allowances by providing these documents:

    • Proof of the worker’s marriage to the natural or adoptive parent of the child if the child is the worker’s son-in-law
    • The child’s birth certificate or other proof of birth or adoption
    • Proof of the child’s U.S. citizenship or legal alien status if the child was not born in the United States
    • W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns if the child had income in the previous year
    • If the worker is deceased, proof of the worker’s death and U.S. military discharge papers
  • Types of survivor benefits

    According to Social Security Administrationthere are five types of survivor benefits:

    • Child benefits
    • Widowed or divorced surviving spouse’s benefits
    • Mother’s or father’s benefits (only if you can prove you have a child under 16 or disabled)
    • Parental benefits (only if you can prove that you were dependent on your child before his death)
    • Lump sum payment in the event of death
  • Survivor benefits explained

    According to Social Security AdministrationSocial Security survivor benefits are paid to the widows, widowers and dependents of eligible workers.

    Therefore, your family members can receive survivors’ benefits when you die, only if you were working and contributing to social security.

    However, you are eligible to receive survivor benefits when a family member dies, depending on their income.

    It should be noted, however, that the deceased family member must have worked long enough to qualify for benefits.

  • The number of Social Security beneficiaries revealed

    Social Security benefits currently support 70 million Americans, whether elderly or disabled.

    Nearly nine out of 10 people aged 65 and over receive benefits, and they account for about 33% of seniors’ income.


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Elaine R. Knight